More Fretting

Yea, ok, I possibly need a bit of a tidy

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especially as this is the “Clean Room”. All the sawdusty stuff happens next door

Anyhoo… finally finished the frets on guitar #1.

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Number of lessons learned:

1) don’t use gorilla glue in the fret-slots.

It does this weird foamy thing… I’m not sure what sort of glue I should use… I seem to recall some sort of acrylic based thing. Will need to research that a bit more

2) make sure the frets are seated properly at hammering-in time, because super-gluing the cracks afterwards is a total pain and I never want to do that again. I saw someone on Youtube doing it. Nope. Hassle.

3) one of the nice things about using a laser-cutter to cut the fret slots is that you can use the same pattern to cut masking tape to the exact right sizes to mask off the fretboard.

4) oil the fretboard before doing this masking… because the final polish with a buffing wheel is dirty. If your fretboard is oiled, you can wipe it off, if it isn’t, getting rid of the stains is difficult.

So there you go. Dressing the frets consisted of

0) masking all the wood off (with masking tape)

1) filing them so there are no high ones, and the whole thing is flat. Using a big flat file (like the one I made earlier) kindof does this by default. Marker pen on each flat shows up scratches and unevenness in height.

2) sand with 200 grit paper… with a block. This is to get rid of the file scratches… any that are too deep, use a fret-dressing file

3) sand with 800 grit paper

4) polish with a dremel with buffing wheel, and metal polish paste.

I use a desk lamp angled so the light bounces off each fret so I can see exactly what’s going on etc.

Turned out quite well… solved some problems from last time, introduced a few more new ones. Not really up to professional standard yet, but it IS 100% the real thing.

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